Official website of the Paralympic Movement
Contrast:
High Contrast
Normal Contrast
Enlargement:
Larger Font Size
Default Font Size
Smaller Font Size
Athletics

Swansea 2014 - Day 2 morning review

McKillop will look to make it a European double with the 1500m T38 still to come on Saturday (23 August).

Man in green shirt holding an Irish flag and smiling to the camera Michael McKillop won his 400m T38 event at the Swansea 2014 IPC Athletics European Championships © • Sporting Wales
By IPC

Ireland’s double world and Paralympic champion Michael McKillop lived up to his reputation as the world’s greatest Paralympic middle-distance runner, streaking away from the rest of the field in the 800m T38 to win gold at the IPC Athletics European Championships on Wednesday (20 August).

The 24-year-old showed no ill-effects from the injury woes that had delayed the start to his 2014 season, racing to the line in a time of 1:58.16 to add the European title to an already long list of outstanding achievements.

“To be able to come off the track after the difficult last 18 months I have had is great, I’m glad to be back,” said McKillop.

“After the World Championships I got injured and I haven’t run the 800m for eight months before today so I was going into the unknown. I’m just glad I was able to run a quick enough time to win.”

McKillop will look to make it a European double with the 1500m T38 still to come on Saturday (23 August).

Triple European champion Evgenii Shvetcov also led from start to finish in his race - the 400m T36 - showing the kind of form that won him four gold medals at the IPC Athletics World Championships in Lyon just over 12 months ago.

The 26-year-old, who also won 100m, 400m and 800m gold at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, controlled the race from the outside lane despite the efforts of Great Britain’s Paul Blake, who had to make do with silver behind the Russian once again.

Shvetcov clocked 53.59 – a season’s best, and just 0.28 seconds outside his world record mark.

Finland’s Henry Manni and Toni Piispanen both picked up their second medals of the championships; Manni added the 800m T34 title to the 100m gold he won yesterday, while world and Paralympic champion Piispanen powered home to win the 100m T51.

“I’m very happy, the race was good,” said Manni. “The time was not the best but the win is what I wanted. It’s my second medal of the Championships and I have still got more events to come. I am looking forward to the rest of the week.”

Germany’s David Behre put on a dominant display in the 400m T44 to secure his first major championship gold. The in-form 27-year-old, who set a new European record over one lap in Leverkusen in June, sped out the blocks to take an early lead and never looked in doubt as he powered home to the line in 51.97.

“I’ve got a big support here in Swansea and that really helps. The time was not so good but it’s a bit cold here which isn’t good for sprinting. I felt really comfortable,” said Behre.

“I’m competing again in the 200m so it’s good to start the championships with a gold medal. I’m hoping for another one.”

With six of the eight finalists in the women’s 400m T20 setting new personal bests, it was no surprise that the winner Marianne Verdonk threw herself to the ground as she crossed the line first in a time of 1:02.29.

“I’m very pleased with the first place. I ran out from the start of the race and I had to work for it in the last 100m,” she said. “My coach told me to go for it from the start and I’d succeed.”

Gold in the women’s 100m T13 went to 16-year-old Erin McBride - the fifth for the host nation – in a time of 13.58.

In the field events, multiple world and Paralympic gold medallist Alexey Ashapatov notched up yet another major championship gold, winning the javelin F57. The Russian threw 34.19m with the shot put and discus still to come this week.

Adrian Matusik of Slovakia won the shot put F44 with 16.19m, and the Czech Republic’s Jan Vanek added the European club throw T51 title to the world bronze he won in Lyon last year, throwing a best of 23.78m

“It’s been a great championships for me, I’ve really enjoyed it. I’m absolutely delighted to have won the gold medal,” said Vanek.

Azerbaijan’s Olokhan Musayev took gold in the discus F56, throwing a season’s best 41.63m, just 14 centimetres shy of the European record he set at London 2012. Serbia’s Drazenko Mitrovic broke his own F54 world record – which he also set in London - throwing 33.68m to finish fourth overall.

Anastasiia Mysnyk of Ukraine improved on the European bronze medal she won two years ago to take gold with a new personal best of 12.73m in the shot put F20 – pushing her compatriot - the defending champion Svitlana Kudelya – down in to third.

And in the jumps, Georgios Kostakis picked up his second 2014 European title for Greece, winning the long jump T47 with 6.50m to add to his triple jump victory yesterday. Spain’s Sara Martinez saved her best until last in the long jump T12, clearing 5.35m in the sixth round to secure victory.

“That’s my first gold medal. I have won silver and bronze before but it’s a nice to get a gold,” said Martinez. “It was a little cold and the conditions made it hard to get a good long jump. I’m pleased to have won.”

In the morning’s semi-finals, Turkey’s Oznur Yilmazer was the fastest of the qualifiers in the women’s 100m T11, whilst in the men’s 100m T11 semis, Frenchman Timothee Adolphe also managed a personal best to go through as the quickest of the four in this afternoon’s final. Radoslav Zlatanov of Bulgaria – bronze medallist at Lyon 2013 - was the quickest in the men’s 100m T13 semi-finals.

The live stream from Swansea 2014, together with videos on demand of individual races, are available to embed on websites in some territories via the IPC’s YouTube channel. For further information please contact IPC Digital Media Manager Natalia Dannenberg-Spreier.

In addition, HD quality broadcast footage from Swansea 2014 is available from the IPC’s Broadcast Manager Jose Manuel Dominguez.

Daily highlights will be available for digital channels via Omnisport, whilst individual races as video on demand can be embedded via Perform’s e-player

Michael McKillop Swansea Ireland

Michael McKillop Swansea Ireland

Swansea 2014 - What to watch on Wednesday 20 August

Day two is highlighted by39 medal events split over two sessions.

Two runners cross the finish line in a stadium Libby Clegg of Scotland and her guide Mikail Huggins cross the line to win gold in the women's T12 100 metres final at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games © • Getty Images
By IPC

Thirty nine medals events will be decided, with the first getting underway at 09:30.

Wednesday, the second day of competition at the IPC Athletics European Championships, offers a more varied programme and the highlight is likely to be Switzerland’s Marcel Hug going head-to-head with France’s Julien Casoli over 1,500m.

Thirty nine medals events will be decided, with the first getting underway at 09:30. Here is what to keep an eye out for:

Men’s javelin F57

The day kicks off with 2011 world champion and home favourite Nathan Stephens aiming for gold. Stephens who will have huge home support knows that to secure the European title he will have to beat Russia’s Alexey Ashapatov who is ahead of him in the rankings.

Start time: 11:15

Men’s 400m T36

After winning gold in Tuesday’s 100m, Russia’s Evgenii Shvetcov will take to the track again hoping to win a second Swansea title. Great Britain’s Paul Blake will be a contender as will Shvetcov’s teammate Andrey Zhimov.

Start time: 11:48

Men’s 800m T38

After an injury affected season, Ireland’s world and Paralympic champion, Michael McKillop will be chasing his first gold medal of the Championships in the men’s 800m T38.

After suffering a trapped never in his foot, McKillop may not be in top form, but should be a certainty for gold.

Start time: 12:22

Men’s 400m T54

With David Weir pulling out of the Championships with an injury at the last minute, this race will be a straight contest between world champion Hug and the Netherlands’ London 2012 silver medallist Kenny van Weeghel. Germany’s Marc Schuh and Finland’s Leo Pekka Tahti will also ensure this is a race to remember.

Start time: 15:52

Women’s 100m T35

A new British athletics star is on the rise. Aged just 14 years of age, Maria Lyle made her international debut at February’s IPC Athletics Grand Prix in Dubai, UAE, and weeks later smashed the 100m world record. This is her first time in a British vest and not only is she one to watch for Swansea 2014, but most likely Rio 2016 and Tokyo 2020!

Start time: 16:49

Women’s 100m T12

After winning Scotland’s first Commonwealth track and field gold for 20 years at Glasgow 2014, Great Britain’s Libby Clegg (Guide: Mikail Huggins) will be even more determined to retain her European title. However, after seeing her European record broken by Ukraine's Oxana Boturchuk in the semi-finals, she knows she will have to be on top form.

Start time: 17:05

Men’s 1,500m T54

World champion and world record holder Hug will start as favourite over this distance, but France's Julien Casoli believes he has a chance of beating the Hug. He finished in fourth place in the 800m - just behind Hug and Weir - at the ParAthletics IPC Grand Prix in Nottwil back in May and there is no doubt there could be more to come from the Frenchman.

Start time: 18:00

Women’s 5,000m T54

Two Brits – Shelly Woods and Glasgow 2014 bronze medallist Jade Jones – will have to put in the performance of their lives if they are to beat Switzerland’s Manuela Schaer who will start as hot favourite.

Start time: 18:22

The morning session will start at 09:30 and the afternoon one at 15:30. Both will be shown live on the official event website which will also feature live results and biographies of every single athlete.

Updates can also be found on Twitter and on Facebook.

Swansea 2014 - Flashquotes Day 1

Find out what the athletes said after they competed at Swansea 2014.

Wheelchair athletes race on a track, photographed from the back Wheelchair athletes during a race of the Swansea 2014 IPC Athletics European Championships © • Sporting Wales
By IPC

Men’s discus F34 - Daniel Scheil (GER)

“It was amazing and a wonderful experience. It was a very unexpected win for me as it’s not my strongest discipline. It’s a wonderful start to my championships.”

Men’s 800m T53 - Pierre Fairbank (FRA)

“I’m very happy because the last time I won at the European Championships was 2003, so I have had to wait for a long time.

“The race was very technical and I knew there was going to be a strong wind, so I didn’t want to go to the front too early. I waited for my turn. I pushed hard in the last 100m of the sprint finish.”

Men’s 400m T51 - Toni Piispanen (FIN)

“It was a challenge winning the race. I had some problems after 200 - I couldn’t breathe well and it was quite painful. I’m very happy to win. I’m competing tomorrow in the 100m so I’m looking forward to it.”

Triple jump F47 - Georgios Kostakis (GRE)

“I feel great. This is my first major gold medal. I won bronze at the World Championships last year so it’s nice to go even better with a gold. We were not happy because the wind was in our faces, so the distance weren’t great.

I was hoping for more but the medal is the most important thing.”

Men’s javelin F42 - Helgi Sveinsson (Iceland)

“It went as I planned except I was hoping for world record but sometimes it does not go that way. The conditions were as good as I could have hoped for but it was not the day. But I am happy as I can be to win the title, this has been my focus all year.”

Women’s 100m T34 - Hannah Cockroft (GBR)

“I’m glad I’ve got another gold but I have got to defend all my medals and that is going to be hard. The big challenge for me will come on Friday when I attempt a new distance (800m).

Men’s 100m T34 - Henry Manni (FIN)

“It was not a very fast race – it was quite tough. The most important thing is the win. It doesn’t matter what the race is like when you win the title.”

Women’s 100m T37 – Mandy Francois-Elie (FRA)

“It was very difficult because of the wind and the false start. But I am very happy to win the title. I was competing against some very strong athletes so that makes it very special.”

Women’s 100m T44 - Marlou Van Rhijn (NED)

“It was so cool. It was the first time I’ve had a title to defend so I was pretty nervous at the start. I’m just so happy I could win that one.

“My start is always quite good, and the end part is always the fun part for me. Considering the headwind it was a tough race but also a very fun one. The crowd were very enthusiastic and it was a pleasure to run in front of them.”

Men’s 100m T44 - Jonnie Peacock (GBR)

“It’s a nice relief. There was a lot of pressure on me coming here. When everyone is telling you you’re the favourite then it adds to the pressure. I knew it was a good field. Felix is a very good athlete and he’s going to get better.

“It was about executing and laying down the start. I knew if I could get a good start it would put the other guys under pressure. I’m happy.

“It was never going to be a rapid time because of the conditions and the head wind.

Women’s 100m T42 - Martina Caironi (ITA)

“It’s Italy’s first gold so I’m very pleased. But I think it’ll be the first of many. Although it was off my personal best it was very windy so I’m happy.”

Men’s 100m T12 - Jason Smyth (IRL)

“I feel good it was good to win. It’s really nice to be here in Swansea, the track is well set up. Thanks to everyone involved from officials to volunteers. I’m focused on the 200m now and then time for a break.”

Men’s shot put F20 - Jefferey Ige (SWE)

“I'm really happy it was just one centimetre from my personal best. The conditions were good, it started to rain a little in the middle of the competition but my technique was good. That's my second European title and it always feels good to win.”

Men’s long jump T11 - Rusian Katyshev (Ukraine)

"Of course I am happy because it is a victory but I would have liked to have jumped a little bit further. But I have to thank my supporters because they helped me so much on my sixth attempt and that is why I won."

Women’s shot put F37 - Eve Berna (Czech Rep)

"I'm very happy with a new personal best and the new record.

"I set my previous record two years ago in London so it has taken me a little while to break it but I am very pleased.

The live stream from Swansea 2014, together with videos on demand of individual races, are available to embed on websites in some territories via the IPC's YouTube channel. For further information please contact IPC Digital Media Manager Natalia Dannenberg-Spreier (Natalia.dannenberg@paralympic.org).

In addition, HD quality broadcast footage from Swansea 2014 is available from the IPC's Broadcast Manager Jose Manuel Dominguez.

Daily highlights will be available for digital channels via Omnisport, whilst individual races as video on demand can be embedded via Perform's e-player

Swansea 2014 - Day 1 evening review

Samantha Kinghorn notched up another gold for Great Britain, her second of the day, adding the 100m T53 title to her 400m victory this morning.

3 upper bodies of athletes on the podium, posing and showing their medals. Jonnie Peacock, Felix Streng and Markus Rehm celebrate their medals in the 100m T44 final at Swansea 2014 IPC Athletics European Championships. © • Sporting Wales
By IPC

Jonnie Peacock, the poster boy of British Paralympic sprinting, gave the home crowds plenty to cheer about in the highly anticipated 100m T44 final - one of a number of thrilling sprint races taking place at the IPC Athletics European Championships on Tuesday (19 August).

The 21-year-old world and Paralympic champion never looked in doubt as he stormed home on the Swansea track to add the European title to his ever expanding medal collection, clocking 11.26.

Germany’s talented teenager Felix Streng took second in 11.53, with his compatriot Markus Rehm third in 11.85.

“It’s a nice relief,” said Peacock. “There was a lot of pressure on me coming here. When everyone is telling you you’re the favourite then it adds to the pressure. I knew it was a good field. Felix is a very good athlete and he’s going to get better.”

The women’s 100m T44 also went to form, with Dutch ‘Blade Babe’ Marlou van Rhijn underlining her place at the top of the rankings, although the 22-year-old was made to work hard for the win.

However with 20 metres remaining van Rhijn’s superiority shone through, speeding to the line in 13.18. Germany’s upcoming talent Irmgard Bensusan took silver (13.39) with Laura Sugar of Great Britain setting a new personal best for bronze (13.71).

“It was so cool. It was the first time I’ve had a title to defend so I was pretty nervous at the start. I’m just so happy I could win that one,” said van Rhijn.

Mandy Francois-Elie was also made to work hard for her European gold medal in the 100m T37, crossing the line in 13.92. The French double world champion was pushed all the way by Russia’s Anna Sapozhnikova who finished with silver in a personal best time of 14.07.

There was no surprise as Hannah Cockroft picked up Great Britain’s second track medal of the afternoon, a straightforward win for the 22-year-old who clocked 18.53 in the 100m T34 – well outside the world record she set earlier this year in Nottwil, but still well clear of the field.

Samantha Kinghorn notched up another gold for Great Britain, her second of the day, adding the 100m T53 title to her 400m victory this morning.

Finland’s Henry Manni tore through the field with terrific power in the second half of the 100m T34 to take gold in 16.42 ahead of European record holder Bojan Mitic of Switzerland.

The 22-year-old showed great strength as he moved from fourth place to first, pipping Mitic on the line.

“It was not a very fast race – it was quite tough. The most important thing is the win. It doesn’t matter what the race is like when you win the title,” he said.

Manni’s compatriot Leo-Pekka Tahti was next out on the track and the Paralympic and world champion made it two in a row for Finland with victory in the 100m T54 ahead of his Dutch rival Kenny van Weeghel.

Ireland’s double world and Paralympic champion Jason Smyth showed he’s the man to beat in the T12 class, winning the 100m with ease in 10.78 ahead of Russia’s world silver medallist Artem Loginov.

“I feel good, it was good to win,” said Smyth. “It’s really nice to be here in Swansea, the track is well set up. Thanks to everyone involved from officials to volunteers. I’m focused on the 200m now and then it’s time for a break.”

With the World and Paralympic 100m T42 champion Heinrich Popow not in Swansea due to injury, Frenchman Clavel Kayitare took full advantage, pulling clear of the field to take gold in 13.08.

World and Paralympic Italy’s Martina Caironi meanwhile made her presence known on the track in the women’s 100m T42, successfully defending her European crown ahead of her German rivals, Vanessa Low and Jana Schmidt.

“It’s Italy’s first gold so I’m very pleased. But I think it’ll be the first of many. Although it was off my personal best it was very windy so I’m happy,” said Caironi.

Great Britain’s Graeme Ballard made a terrific start in the 100m T36 but he was unable to hold off Russia’s multiple world and Paralympic gold medallist Evgenii Shvetcov who reeled in the Briton in the final 20 metres to hold on to the title he won two years ago in a season’s best 12.33.

There were further sprint wins for Russia from world champion and world record holder Andrey Vdovin in the 100m T37 and Dmitrii Safronov in the 100m T35, whose long, graceful stride made winning look easy in a season’s best 12.73.

Ukraine’s European record holder Mykyta Senyk won the 100m T38 in 11.74, and there was track gold for Germany in the women’s 200m T36, as Claudia Nicoleitzik held on to her lead off the bend to win in 32.26.

In the longer distances Switzerland’s Manuela Schaer kicked off her European Championship campaign with a win in the 400m T54, clocking 59.11, whilst Poland’s Alicja Fiodorow won the women’s 400m T47.

A gritty display by Toni Piispanen secured the Finn gold in the 400m T51 – the 38-year-old looked to be struggling in the final 100m and just made it over the line in first place.

“It was a challenge winning the race,” he explained. “I had some problems after 200m - I couldn’t breathe well and it was quite painful. I’m very happy to win. I’m competing tomorrow in the 100m so I’m looking forward to it.”

Austria’s Thomas Geierspichler made his intentions clear from the start of the 1500m T52, taking to the front from the gun and crossing the line with a convincing victory. Frenchman Pierre Fairbank meanwhile timed his race to perfection, biding his time until the final 100m of the 800m T53 before pushing home for gold.

“I’m very happy because the last time I won at the European Championships was 2003, so I have had to wait for a long time,” said Fairbank. “The race was very technical and I knew there was going to be a strong wind, so I didn’t want to go to the front too early. I waited for my turn.”

Out in the field, Russia’s two-time double world and Paralympic champion Alexei Ashapatov continued his domination of the shot put F57 - a season’s best 13.81m earning him another major championship gold.

There was another gold for Russia courtesy of world and Paralympic champion Nikita Prokhorov, who added the European javelin F46 title to his collection, leading from the first throw and managing a best of 45.24m. The javelin F42 title went to Iceland’s Helgi Sveinsson, improving on the silver he won two years ago.

“It went as I planned except I was hoping for the world record, but sometimes it does not go that way,” said Sveinsson, who won in Lyon last year. “The conditions were as good as I could have hoped for but it was not the day. But I am happy as I can be to win the title, this has been my focus all year.”

Daniel Scheil moved from second place up to first in the discus F34 with a final throw of 25.30m – a new personal best for the 41-year-old, and Georgios Kostakis took gold in the triple jump F47 with an opening hop, skip and jump of 13.78m.

In the women’s long jump F11 Sweden’s Viktoria Karlsson leapt to gold with a personal best of 4.48m, whilst a personal best of 1.84m gave Belarus their first gold of the championships courtesy of Siarhei Burdukou in the high jump F12.

Wheelchair athletes Swansea 2014

Wheelchair athletes Swansea 2014

Jonnie Peacock Felix Streng Markus Rehm, 100m T44 final Swansea

Jonnie Peacock Felix Streng Markus Rehm, 100m T44 final Swansea

Swansea 2014 - Day 1 morning review

IPC Athletics European Championships get underway in Swansea

Women doing long jump shortly before the landing Russia's Margarita Goncharova wins the women's long jump T38 at the Swansea 2014 IPC Athletics European Championships © • Luc Percival
By IPC

Eleven gold medals were decided on the first morning of competition at the IPC Athletics European Championships in Swansea, Wales, with impressive victories for young international debutants as well as some of the world’s most experienced para-athletes.

Russia’s Margarita Goncharova made the most of the warm and sunny conditions to add the European long jump F38 title to her World and Paralympic victories.

The 23-year-old recorded 4.86m in her opening jump to take what she will hope is the first of four gold medals in Swansea, with the 100m, 400m (T38) and 4x100m T35-38 still to come.

Meanwhile 18-year-old Samantha Kinghorn, making her senior debut in the GB & NI vest, gave fans in the stands plenty to cheer about as she took home Great Britain’s first gold medal of the championships in the women’s 400m T53.

“It's great winning a gold medal in front of a home crowd and my family have travelled down from Scotland to see me race - It's amazing,” she said. “The wind was behind me so I got a fast start. The lactic started to burn half-way but I managed to keep it going.

“I’ve got the 100m tonight so I’m going to go for a nap and try and recover the best that I can. I’ll try not to let the excitement get to me so I’ll go and watch some TV now to calm down.”

The first European record of the Championships came courtesy of the Czech Republic’s shot put F37 defending champion, Eve Berna.

The 28-year-old bettered the previous record she set at the Paralympic Games in London by just one centimetre, managing 11.01m in her penultimate throw to take the top spot on the podium.

"I'm very happy with a new personal best and the new record,” said Berna. "I set my previous record two years ago in London so it has taken me a little while to break it but I am very pleased."

Sweden’s Paralympic silver medallist Jeffrey Ige also successfully defended his European title from the Netherlands two years ago, winning the shot put F20 with a best of 15.49m, just one centimetre shy of the European record he managed in London.

“I'm really happy it was just one centimetre from my personal best. The conditions were good, it started to rain a little in the middle of the competition but my technique was good. That's my second European title and it always feels good to win.”

And Ukraine’s world champion Oleksandr Doroshenko - another European gold medallist from two years ago in Stadskanaal - added victory at Swansea 2014 to his list of achievements in the shot put F38 with a best of 14.43m.

"I am pleased to be able to get the first gold medal of these Championships for Ukraine, I hope it is not the last one,” he said. "It was a good competition and I am enjoying being in Swansea."

Indeed Doroshenko’s teammate Ruslan Katyshev soon provided Ukraine’s second gold medal with a win in a thrilling men’s long jump F11 competition. The 31-year-old saved his best til last, jumping 5.96m in the sixth and final round to take the gold ahead of early leader Martin Parejo Maza of Spain.

Earlier on in the morning Nantenin Keita of France secured the first victory on the Swansea university track, winning gold in the 400m T13 in 59.46 - a season’s best for the 29-year-old - although she remained disappointed with her time.

“It was difficult. I was enjoying it but it was my first race since the Paralympic Games. The time was bad,” said Keita. “The next race will be the World Championships next year and I hope it will be better for me than here.”

Gold in the men’s discus F12 went to the favourite Kim Lopez Gonzalez of Spain, who threw a personal best 48.75m to add to the world title he won in Lyon last year.

And a season’s best 24.62m - over eight metres clear of the field - was good enough for Germany’s Marianne Buggenhagen to add to her impressive medal collection with a win in the discus F55.

World javelin F12 champion Anna Sorokina secured Russia’s second gold medal of the opening session, leading from the first throw to win with a third round personal best of 40.67m, whilst Vladislav Slolov rounded off the morning session with another convincing win for Russia, winning the men’s club F20 with a personal best of 34.10.

In the morning’s heats, reigning World and Paralympic champion Mandy Francois-Elie of France made it safely through to this afternoon’s final of the women’s 100m T37, with Russia’s Anna Sapozhnikova leading the way in her semi-final. Defending European champion Maria Seifert of Germany also qualified comfortably.

In the semi-finals of the men’s 100m T12 Jason Smyth, making his debut in the T12 class, cruised through to this afternoon’s finals. Russia’s Paralympic 100m T12 champion Fedor Trikolich failed to progress, finishing second in his semi-final behind Joan Munar Martinez of Spain.

The final of the men’s 100m T34 is also set to provide plenty of excitement this afternoon with Finland’s Henri Manni leading the qualifiers in 16.69. Switzerland’s Mitic Bojan, who set a new European record of 15.85 in Grosseto earlier in the season, also goes through.

The live stream from Swansea 2014, together with videos on demand of individual races, are available to embed on websites in some territories via the IPC’s YouTube channel. For further information please contact IPC Digital Media Manager Natalia Dannenberg-Spreier.

In addition, HD quality broadcast footage from Swansea 2014 is available from the IPC’s Broadcast Manager Jose Manuel Dominguez.

Daily highlights will be available for digital channels via Omnisport, whilst individual races as video on demand can be embedded via Perform’s e-player

Goncharova long jump T38 Swansea 2014

Goncharova long jump T38 Swansea 2014

Who will make the headlines at Swansea 2014?

Here are some of the star names who could be making the news at the IPC Athletics European Championships.

Marlou van Rhijn  crosses the finish line to win gold in the women's 100m T44, one of the highlights of the 2013 IPC Athletics World Championships in Lyon, France. The Netherlands' Marlou van Rhijn © • Getty Images
By IPC

As the clock ticks down towards the start of competition on Tuesday (19 August) at the 2014 IPC Athletics European Championships in Swansea, Great Britain, here are some of the para-athletes that could be making the headlines this week.

Marcel Hug (Switzerland)

There will be no-one more upset at the absence of Great Britain's David Weir, than the Swiss 'Silver Bullet' Marcel Hug. With no Weir however, Hug has the chance to follow up his five world titles from last year with European success in the 400m, 800m, 1,500m and 5,000m. Biazzarely, France's Julien Casoli said he is not impressed by Hug. Let's see if he still thinks the same after Swansea 2014.

Marlou Van Rhijn (The Netherlands)

The Ducth ‘Blade Babe’ was dubbed the world’s fastest female Paralympian last year when she clocked 12.96 seconds over 100m, before going on to win double gold at the IPC Athletics World Championships in Lyon.

The 22-year-old has already broken the 400m T43 world record this year and will be out to clock more fast times in the Welsh city when she competes in the 100m, 200m and 400m.

Markus Rehm (Germany)

All eyes will be on the in-form German Paralympic and world champion who leapt in to the history books last month, smashing his own T44 world best in the long jump to win the German able-bodied Championships.

Rehm’s leap of 8.24m sets him apart from the rest of the field – the question is, how far can he go in Swansea?

Stef Reid (Great Britain) and Marie-Amelie Le Fur (France)

Another long jumper breaking world records this year is Great Britain’s Stef Reid. The 29-year-old added 2cm on to her French rival Marie Amelie Le Fur’s world mark back in May, jumping 5.45m.

The pair then lined up in at the Glasgow Grand Prix Diamond League meeting last month, and it was Reid who stole the show once more, leaping to 5.47m.

Le Fur – who won the 100m T44 at the Paralympic Games in London - meanwhile has been focussing on the field events this season and will be determined to reclaim her place at the top of the world.

Jonnie Peacock (Great Britain) and Felix Streng (Germany)

Jonnie Peacock became the star of British Paralympic sprinting when he clinched gold in the highly anticipated 100m T44 at the Games in London, but the 21-year-old won’t be taking anything for granted with the likes of Germany’s young sprint sensation Felix Streng making his own headlines this season, winning in Grosetto, Italy and finishing a close second in Berlin, Germany, behind South African Arnu Fourie.

Leo-Pekka Tahti (Finland) and Kenny van Weeghel (the Netherlands)

Pekka Tahti and van Weeghel have dominated the T54 wheelchair sprints in recent years; at the 2012 European Championships the Flying Finn won the 100m with his Dutch rival taking second, then in the 400m they swapped positions with van Weeghel taking gold.

It was a similar story at Lyon, France, last year with Pekka Tahti winning the 100m and van Weeghel the 200m – can either athlete make it a double victory in Swansea?

Aled Davies (Great Britain)

The home favourite and double world champion from Bridgend, South Wales, will be hoping he can give the local crowds something to cheer about in the shot put and discus F42.

Davies clinched world gold in the shot put and discus last summer to add to the discus gold he won at London 2012. With a discus world record already under his belt this year, the 23-year-old has already said that he would love to throw even further on home soil.

Jason Smyth (Ireland)

Ireland’s sprint sensation will be the one to watch in the men’s T12 sprints for visually impaired para-athletes. The 27-year-old holds the T13 world records in both the 100m and 200m and has a trophy cabinet bursting with silverware, having won double gold at the Paralympic Games in 2008 and 2012, as well as double world gold in Lyon last year.

Smyth clocked 10.66 at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, and with the four-time Paralympic champion in that sort of form, watch out for more world records this week.

A record 560 athletes from 37 countries will be taking part in the 2014 IPC Athletics European Championships between 18-23 August at Swansea University, Great Britain.

Some tickets, priced at £3, are still available to purchase for Swansea 2014 and can be purchased from the ticket website.

The live stream from Swansea 2014, together with videos on demand of individual races, are available to embed on websites in some territories via the IPC’s YouTube channel. For further information please contact IPC Digital Media Manager Natalia Dannenberg-Spreier.

In addition, HD quality broadcast footage from Swansea 2014 is available from the IPC’s Broadcast Manager Jose Manuel Dominguez.

Daily highlights will be available for digital channels via Omnisport, whilst individual races as video on demand can be embedded via Perform’s e-player.